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24Oct2014

Parent and Family Weekend

We are pleased to announce this year's Parent and Family…

24Oct2014

Enchanted Modernities - Mysticism, Landscape & the American West

Caine College of the Arts and the Leverhulme Trust…

24Oct2014

USU Department of Art + Design Faculty Exhibition

This exhibit features Mike Daines and will be displayed…

24Oct2014

A+T=I2

Held in the Tippetts Exhibit Hall, Artist Plus Teacher…

24Oct2014

Soccer vs. UNLV

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Effective test preparation includes:

  • studying the “right” material.
  • reading assigned text chapters or supplemental readings.
  • attending and participating in all classes.
  • taking notes.
  • completing all assignments.

Correct. Studying the "right" material = studying facts, figures, concepts that your professor considers important. This information comes from his/her lectures; your textbook; handouts provided in class; supplemental readings; laboratory exercises; and homework and other course assignments. Questions included in previous tests from your class give you a clue as to what material a professor considers important material. Additionally, a professor will sometimes indicate in class that information will be on a test. If a professor keeps old test on reserve, ensure that you review these. If you are still unsure about what is the "right" material to study, ask your professor.



  • studying the “right” material.
  • reading assigned text chapters or supplemental readings.
  • attending and participating in all classes.
  • taking notes.
  • completing all assignments.

Correct. Reading involves more than just highlighting phrases in your text. You must ensure that your reading results in comprehension: a substantive understanding of the concepts and facts being presented. To accomplish this, you must use active reading techniques where you create questions, find answers to your questions, make connections between what you have read in your text and what is in your lecture, and create examples other than what your text provides to explain concepts and terms.



  • studying the “right” material.
  • reading assigned text chapters or supplemental readings.
  • attending and participating in all classes.
  • taking notes.
  • completing all assignments.

Correct. Professors typically use class time to elaborate on concepts presented in your assigned text reading. They do this through lecture; verbal, visual, and auditory examples; class discussion; and presenting handouts or other study aids. Many professors specify what information you will be responsible for knowing for your tests. They may even conduct test reviews during class time or announce out-of-class study sessions. Attending and participating in each class is the best way to ensure that you know how to prepare for your exams.



  • studying the “right” material.
  • reading assigned text chapters or supplemental readings.
  • attending and participating in all classes.
  • taking notes.
  • completing all assignments.

Correct. Note–taking is essential. Many professors lecture on information that is not contained in your text. They will usually test you on this information. Some professors may test ONLY on information contained in their lectures. However, taking notes involves more than writing down what a professor says. You will learn more about creating study guides from your notes later in this module.



  • studying the “right” material.
  • reading assigned text chapters or supplemental readings.
  • attending and participating in all classes.
  • taking notes.
  • completing all assignments.

Correct. Assignment types are varied, but their main purpose is to provide opportunities for you to increase your learning beyond the three to five hours you are in the classroom. Ensure that you complete all of your assignments. Many professors will include problems or information from assignments in their tests, especially in science and math courses. If you do not understand the purpose for an assignment, talk with your professor. This can help you to approach the assignment as more than “busy work”.



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