Nuptiae (Marriage)

A virgo may marry a senator or imperator but not a rex. Juno oversees all nuptiae. The potential bride and groom must be in the same region and call Juno to them for her blessing on the nuptiae. If Juno approves, she will formalize the nuptiae by taking the woman's palla pietatis (white shawl) and dos card (dowry) and giving the groom the face value of the dos in Denarii.

The Nature of Nuptiae

Married couples do not share property in common but may at any time exchange the properties they own, except suffragia which matronae may never use. Matronae may not engage in proelia even if they are in possession of their husband's legiones. However, a married matrona may call upon Juno to aid her husband during the final concursatio of a proelium by doubling the number of the roll on her husband's die.

A married matrona may beseech Juno to break up any formal amicitia. If Juno decides to break up the amicitia, all properties except suffragia remain in the custory of the player who happens to have them at the moment.

Divortium (Divorce)

If a husband and/or wife wish to dissolve their marriage, one or both may ask Juno for a divortium (divorce). Juno may decide to grant or forbid the divortium. If she grants the divortium, the husband must return the full value of the dos to Juno, who then gives those properties to his wife, now an Amazon. Juno may be paid in any properties according to their value (except suffragia). All the husband's remaining properties stay with him, except those which he has transferred to his wife and she is holding at the time of the divortium. A matrona being divorced does not have to return any of her husband's properties which happen to be in her custody at the time of the divortium. If the value of the husband's total properties (except suffragia) fall short of the face value of the dos, Juno may kill him. His wife may lay claim only to the properties her ex-husband, and not his amici, has in his possession at the time of the divorce.

 

The first bond of society is marriage.

Marcus Tullius Cicero