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Disability Resource Center Assessment

Ongoing assessment and evaluation is an important part of maintaining high-quality services in the DRC. Student Satisfaction Surveys and focus groups are used to identify both areas of strength and places for improvement. For the most part, our satisfaction surveys have been overwhelmingly positive. In the most recent survey, 89% of students reported feeling satisfied with their DRC experience.

In addition to surveys and focus groups, the DRC staff are strongly encouraged to be continually assessing each area of our office. At the end of each semester, the DRC holds a meeting with all employee’s to review our work from the previous semester and decide on changes that will be implemented moving forward.

Assessment and evaluation are also done by comparing our office's practices with other successful programs. We also maintain close contact with other DRC’s in the state and with our professional national organization to make sure that our practices are in keeping with state and national trends.

Mission Statement

Mission

Our mission is to facilitate equal access to all university programs, services, and activities by collaborating with the university community, promoting principles of Universal Design, celebrating disability as a natural aspect of diversity, and coordinating reasonable accommodations.

Goals and Learning Outcomes

Goals

  • Assist the University in achieving compliance with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act. This responsibility includes providing services and accommodations to students, faculty, and staff.
  • Provide support to faculty by providing training, designing accommodations, and consulting on disability-related issues.
  • Provide supportive services to individuals with disabilities, including academic assistance, adaptive equipment, counseling, readers, transcribers, interpreters, and advocacy to ensure equal access to education, employment, and other University programs.
  • Review architectural and program accessibility and make recommendations for the removal of barriers.

Learning Objectives

  • Self-Determination: Student's practice self determination as the choose if and how they will interact with our office. All students working with the DRC do so through a voluntary process. Each semester students choose to return to our office to continue services.
  • Personal Responsibility: The DRC sets deadlines, policies and procedures that students are expected to meet and follow.
  • Knowledge of Rights: Students working with the DRC become aware of their rights as a person with a disability.
  • Effective Communication: Students collaborate with their Accessibility Consultant, DRC staff and faculty to self advocate.

Foundational Documents

Legal Obligations

University responsibilities to individuals with disabilities are mandated by two main pieces of federal legislation. They are Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Both are civil rights statutes aimed at preventing discrimination against individuals on the basis of their disability. It is the policy of USU to comply with the fundamental principles of nondiscrimination and accommodation set forth in both of these laws.


 

Disability Resource Center ASSESSMENT PLAN/MATRIX, 2017-2018
Goals
(Objectives and Learning Outcomes)
Assessment Tool
(Criteria)
Data Source
Documentation
Timeline Responsible
Persons
Map to
Division Goals
  • Assist the University in achieving compliance with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act. This responsibility includes providing services and accommodations to students, faculty, and staff.
Data Review  Yearly Program Reports Spring 18 Director Goals 2, 6 and 8
  • Provide support to faculty by providing training, designing accommodations, and consulting on disability-related issues.
Survey Faculty Survey Spring 18 Director Goals 2, 6 and 8
  • Provide supportive services to individuals with disabilities, including academic assistance, adaptive equipment, counseling, readers, transcribers, interpreters, and advocacy to ensure equal access to education, employment, and other University programs.
 Survey Annual Student Survey Spring 18 Director Goals 2, 6 and 8
  • Review architectural and program accessibility and make recommendations for the removal of barriers.
Architectural Review ADA Architectural Review Summer 18 Director Goals 2, 6 and 8


Accommodated Testing
Category '15-16 School Year Summer '16 Fall '16 Spring '17 '16-17 School Year
Total Number of Tests 3750 123 1254 982 2359
Total Number of Students 41 289 263 593
Total Number of Courses 33 338 361

Note Taking
Category Fall '15 Spring '16 Fall '16 Spring '17
Number of students requesting notes 97 78 96 83
Number of classes requested 234 201 237 205
Average classes requested/student 2.41 2.58 2.47 2.47
Number of classes with a note taker 186 136 156 130
Number of note takers 104 102 122 115

Accessible Materials
Category Spring '16 Fall '16 Spring '17
Requests Fulfilled 195 167 195
Students 57 55 55
Books 142 136 168
Courses 126 125 133
Days to Completions 56 53 24


Interpreting & Transcription
Category '15-16 School Year '16-17 School Year
Hours of Interpreting 1478 2079
Hours of Transcription 844 544

Each summer the DRC spends time reviewing responses to our annual survey and other sources of assessment data to develop a plan for changes and improvements that can be made during the coming year. Below are the areas of focus for the 2017-2018 school year.

  • Imporved student outreach: Respondents to our Annual Student Survey indicated that students would like to see a change in the types of advertising and outreach used to inform students about the DRC and our services. Students suggested that they would like the DRC to place greater emphasis on letting students know what types of academic issues might be indicators of undiganosed disabilities. Based on this feedback the DRC has adjusted the messages included in our outreach materials used for the 2017-2018 school year. We will be assessing the effectivness of this change at the conclusion of the school year.
  • New assistive technology: During a focus group with students who use software to listen to their course reading materials it became clear that students would appreciate a single piece of software for accessing all their accessible reading materials. This prompted a review of the avaiable products and the purchase of Capti.
  • Improved faculty traning materials: Prompted by data gathered from the Annual DRC Survey ways to improve faculty training materils were identified. Over the next few months both print and online materials were developed to better prepare USU faculty to work with students with disabilites.