In general, my philosophy of teaching, my teaching objectives, my pedagogy etc., naturally parallels my philosophy of mentoring students in research and scholarship. I embrace individuality among students, emphasize the ongoing pursuit of knowledge, try to lead by example, and always press upon students the implications of our daily actions to the state of the real world. I operate under the premise that all students are individual humans with different strengths and weaknesses, and accordingly, different strategies of teaching will engage different individuals. More specifically, for example, in the lecture component of Fish Diversity and Conservation class (WATS 3100), I combine traditional lecture, discussion, and on-the-board problem solving.



WATS 3100 Fish Diversity and Conservation


Fall Semester
WATS 3100 - 3 credit hours
Time: Tuesday 10:30-11:45 AM and Thursday 10:30-11:45, BNR 314


The course objectives and learning outcomes of this class include:


  1. Gain factual knowledge about the biology, evolutionary history, and diverse adaptations of fishes.
    • Students will be familiar with physiological and behavioral adaptations of fishes that allow them to feed, reproduce, and survive in diverse environments.
    • Students will be familiar with the evolutionary history of fishes, and be able to classify distinct groups of fishes based on physical traits.
  2. Learn fundamental principles and theories about ecology and conservation, using examples of fishes and their aquatic habitats.
    • Students will be familiar with ecological concepts such as species interactions, life-history strategies, and natural selection.
    • Students will gain an appreciation for the functional role of fishes.
  3. Develop skills in writing and public presentation.
    • Students will be able to present scientific information to the public in a concise and informative manner.

Prerequisite: BIOL 1010 or 1610 or 1620.

WATS 3110: Fish Diversity and Conservation lab


Fall Semester
Time: Tuesday 1:30-5:20 PM, BNR 004


The course objectives and learning outcomes of this class include:


  1. Gain factual knowledge about fish identification, taxonomy, and anatomy.
    • Students will be able to identify freshwater fishes of North America.
    • Students will know how to enter data they collected in a spreadsheet and answer comparative science questions.
    • Students will be familiar with techniques for catching and studying fish, assessing fish habitat, and aging fish bony structures and conducting diet analyses.
  2. Learn fundamental principles and theories about fish classification and diversity.
    • Students will be familiar with fish taxonomy and systematics.

Prerequisite: BIOL 1010 or 1610 or 1620.

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