Utah State University

Official IPE Blog

Ethanol and Renewable Fuel Standard

Tall Row of Field CornJanuary 31, 2016

This report examines the history and impact of government subsidies for the corn ethanol industry on the U.S. economy as a whole and also on specific “corn belt” counties. We are primarily concerned with the impact of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) following its implementation in 2005. By looking at both local and national economies before and after implementation of the RFS we found that not only is the RFS bad for the overall U.S. economy, but also for the very counties expected to benefit most. Understanding the true costs and benefits of ethanol subsidies like the RFS will allow policy makers to better evaluate the structure and necessity of these policies moving forward.

Download Full Report here.


Ethanol and Renewable Fuel Standard

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December 3, 2015

The Reliability of Renewable Energy reports are an examination of the five most common sources of renewable electricity generation: wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, and hydro. The studies assess each source’s economic, physical, and environmental aspects.

Reliability of Renewable Energy: Wind

Download Full Report here.

Download Condensed Report here.

Reliability of Renewable Energy: Solar

Download Full Report here.

Download Condensed Report here.

Reliability of Renewable Energy: Biomass

Download Full Report here.

Download Condensed Report here.

Reliability of Renewable Energy: Geothermal

Download Full Report here.

Download Condensed Report here.

The Reliability of Renewable Energy: Hydro

Download Full Report here.

Download Condensed Report here.

 


Ethanol and Renewable Fuel Standard

Check out this op-ed by Dr. William Shughart and Dr. Diana Thomas on airlines and the DOJ’s antitrust efforts.  http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/dec/19/shughart-antitrust-busybodies/

“Moreover, the antitrust law enforcement decisions are vulnerable to the influence of special-interest groups, as we recently documented in a Cato Institute policy analysis. When it comes to reviewing mergers, such groups work hard to have their preferences represented in the final decision. In the case of the American-US Airways consolidation, one cannot ignore the parochial interests in low airfares of Washington’s political elites, who frequently fly out of and return to Washington Reagan National as well as to the Big Apple’s LaGuardia Airport.”