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Criteria 1300 for Integrated Breadth Courses

To meet the University Studies Breadth Requirement, students must take a minimum of two of the following six multi-disciplinary courses:


USU 1300 U.S. Institutions

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Objectives:

  • To meet the American Institutions requirement mandated by the state legislature:
    "A student shall demonstrate a reasonable understanding of the history, principles, form of government, and economic system of the United States prior to receiving a bachelor's degree or teaching credential."
  • To provide a multi-disciplinary introduction to the history, principles, form of government, and economic system of the United States.

Credits:

3 credits

Maximum Class Size:

To be determined.

Prerequisites:

None

Content:

It is impossible to provide a thorough understanding of the ýhistory, principles, form of government, and economic system of the United Statesý in a single undergraduate course. However, students can be exposed to the linkages between the disciplines and the basic issues and events that have shaped the American experience.

The course should utilize a coherent theme or themes to provide continuity. The theme of tensions in the American experience, especially the tensions between conflicting values, is a possible way to integrate the course. Examples of these tensions include protection and freedom, freedom and equality, Individual rights and the common good.

Pedagogy:

  1. Students will be required to complete writing assignments.
  2. Students will be required to participate in collaborative activities.
  3. Students will develop their information literacy skills, including an understanding of the nature, organization, and methods of access and evaluation of both electronic and traditional resources in the subject area.
  4. Opportunities will be provided for discussion.
  5. The course proposal will include ways to access achievement of the objectives for this course.

Staffing:

Taught by faculty. The appropriate number of teaching assistants should be provided.

Approval Process:

Departments desiring to offer sections of integrated courses will submit a General Education Course Approval request and course syllabi to the Provost's Office, UMC 1435. The initial evaluation will be made by the faculty American Institutions Committee. The final decision will be made by the General Education Subcommittee and the Educational Policies Committee.

CRITERIA FOR APPROVED BREADTH COURSES: AMERICAN INSTITUTIONS

  1. Courses must provide a broad and balanced perspective of major discipline.
  2. Except for courses or examinations, which is part of the University Studies Competency Requirements (see page 9), breadth courses must have no prerequisites.
  3. Courses should be offered at least once every school year.

Specific Criteria: American Institutions

In evaluating courses for the American Institutions approved list, the factors listed below will be considered. Not all of these criteria must be met for course approval, but together they suggest what a "strong" course proposal should include.

  1. The course should make a significant contribution toward meeting the legislative intent that students "shall demonstrate a reasonable understanding of the history, principles, form of government, and economic system of the United States . . ." To satisfy this mandate, the course must provide a broad and balanced perspective of U.S. history, U.S. political institutions, and/or U.S. economic institutions.
  2. The course should help students to understand and evaluate original sources, e.g., original writings and/or presentations of data.
  3. The course should require students to:
    • Complete writing assignments.
    • Participate in collaborative activities.
  4. The course should further the development of information literacy skills, including an understanding of the nature, organization, and methods of access and evaluation of both electronic and traditional resources in the subject area.
  5. The course should provide opportunities for discussion.
  6. The course proposal should include ways to access achievement of the specific criteria listed above for this breadth area.

Approval Process:

Departments will be asked to recommend courses by submitting course syllabi. The initial evaluation of courses will be made by the faculty American Institutions Committee. The final decision will be made by the General Education Subcommittee and Educational Policies Committee. Unless a department can provide strong justification, not more than one course from a department will be placed on the approved list.

USU 1320 Civilization: Humanities

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Objectives:

  1. To develop understanding and awareness (e.g. cultural literacy) of civilizations.
  2. To assist students in identifying broad themes that cut across human history and culture.
  3. To provide an understanding of the nature, history, and methods of the humanities.

Credits:

3 credites

Prequisites:

None

Content:

The content of humanities breadth courses should be selected for its importance, interest, value, coherence and relevance to the course objectives. All humanities breadth courses will prepare students for critical thinking using the methods of the humanities. Humanities breadth courses will not emphasize the acquisition of specific facts or skills as ends in themselves.

Proposed humanities breadth courses will define ways in which the achievement of the course objectives will be assessed.

Pedagogy:

  1. Students will be required to complete writing assignments.
  2. Students will be required to participate in collaborative activities.
  3. Students will develop their information literacy skills, including an understanding of the nature, organization, and methods of access and evaluation of both electronic and traditional resources in the subject area.
  4. Students will have opportunities for discussion.

Approval Process:

Departments desiring to offer sections of integrated courses will submit a General Education Course Approval request and course syllabi to the Provost's Office, UMC 1435. The initial evaluation will be made by the faculty Humanities Committee. The final decision will be made by the General Education Subcommittee and the Educational Policies Committee.

CRITERIA FOR APPROVED BREADTH COURSES: HUMANITIES

  1. Courses must provide a broad and balanced perspective of a major discipline.
  2. Except for courses or examinations, which are part of the University Studies Competency Requirements (see page 9), breadth courses must have no prerequisites.
  3. Courses should be offered at least once every school year.

Specific Criteria: Humanities

In evaluating courses for the Humanities approved list, the factors listed below will be considered. Not all of these criteria must be met for course approval, but tougher they suggest what a "strong" course proposal should include.

  1. The course should address how people achieve human self-understanding through the mediums of language, oral tradition, literature, philosophy, ethics or other endeavors of self-explanation.
  2. The course should explore how people have come to understand themselves and to explain their actions.
  3. The course should create knowledge and promote self-understanding by comparing contrasting cultures, beliefs, and historical periods.
  4. The course should help students understand origins and history of humanistic methods.
  5. The courses should promote the following student learning goals:
    • Capacity for well-reasoned critical thought.
    • Capacity for an educated evaluation of alternative perspectives, thoughts, and approaches to the humanities.
    • Ability to integrate insights across the humanities.
  6. The course should help students to understand and evaluate original sources, e.g. original writings and/or other creative works.
  7. The course should require students to:
    • Complete writing assignments.
    • Participate in collaborative activities.
  8. The course should further the development of information literacy skills, including an understanding of the nature, organization, and methods of access and evaluation of both electronic and traditional resources in the subject area.
  9. The course should provide opportunities for discussion.
  10. The course proposal should include ways to access achievement of the specific criteria listed above for this breadth area.

Approval Process:

Departments will be asked to recommend courses by submitting course syllabi and a one-page memo explaining how the course meets the requirements for Depth Humanities (available on the website for the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies and Research). The initial evaluation of courses will be made by the faculty Humanities Committee. The final decision will be made by the General Education Subcommittee and Educational Policies Committee. Unless a department can provide strong justification, not more than one course from a department will be placed on the approved list.

USU 1330 Civilization: Creative Arts

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Click here for example syllabi
Click here for example syllabi
Click here for sample information literacy assignments and activities

Objectives:

  1. To expose students to the significance of the creative arts.
  2. To develop students aesthetic judgments.
  3. To student the creative arts as a means of personal and social expression.
  4. To promote an understanding of the nature, history, and methods of the arts.

Credits:

3 credits

Maximum Class Size:

To be determined.

Prequisites:

None

Content:

The course will utilize examples and illustrations from a variety of media, for instance, theater, music, literature, dance, painting, sculpture, architecture, attire, and interior design. Issues to be addressed include:

"What is art?" and "What functions do the arts serve?" The course will also consider the arts in their historical and social context and provide a cross-cultural perspective by illustrating how art forms vary between different societies.

Pedagogy:

  1. Students will be required to complete writing assignments.
  2. Students will be required to participate in collaborative activities.
  3. Students will develop their information literacy skills, including an understanding of the nature, organization, and methods of access and evaluation of both electronic and traditional resources in the subject area.
  4. Opportunities will be provided for discussion.
  5. The course proposal will include ways to access achievement of the objectives for this course.

Staffing:

Taught by faculty. The appropriate number of teaching assistants should be provided.

Approval Process:

Departments desiring to offer sections of integrated courses will submit course syllabi to the Director of University Studies. The initial evaluation will be made by the faculty Creative Arts Committee. The General Education Subcommittee and the Educational Policies Committee will make the final decision.

CRITERIA FOR APPROVED BREADTH COURSES: CREATIVE ARTS

  1. Courses must provide a broad and balanced perspective of a major discipline.
  2. Except for courses or examinations, which are part of the University Studies Competency Requirements, breadth courses must have no prerequisites.
  3. Courses should be offered at least once every school year.

Specific Criteria: Creative Arts

In evaluating courses for the Creative Arts approved list, the factors listed below will be considered. Not all of these criteria must be met for course approval, but together they suggest what a 'strong" course proposal should include.

  1. The course should promote the following student learning goals:
    • Capacity for informed and well-reasoned aesthetic judgments
    • Educated appreciation for artistic performances
    • Understanding of an art discipline's nature, history, and methods
  2. The course should address the issues of what is art and what functions art serves.
  3. The course should explore the effects of art on the human experience.
  4. The course should consider art in its historical and social contexts.
  5. The course should compare art forms in different societies or time periods.
  6. The course should consider relationships between different art forms.
  7. The course should require students to attend events outside of class, e.g., lectures, performances, and exhibitions.
  8. The course should help students to understand and evaluate original sources, e.g., original writings and/or other creative works.
  9. The course should require students to:
    • Complete writing assignments.
    • Participate in collaborative activities.
  10. The course should further the development of information literacy skills, including an understanding of the nature, organization, and methods of access and evaluation of both electronic and traditional resources in the subject area.
  11. The course should provide opportunities for discussion.
  12. The course proposal should include ways to assess achievement of the specific criteria listed above for this breadth area.

Approval Process:

Departments will be asked to recommend courses by submitting course syllabi. The initial evaluation of courses will be made by the faculty Creative Arts Committee. The final decision will be made by the General Education Subcommittee and Educational Policies Committee. Unless a department can provide strong justification, not more than one course from a department will be placed on the approved list.

USU 1340 Social Systems and Issues

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Objectives:

  1. To assist students in understanding the nature, history, theories, and methods of the social sciences.
  2. To develop a comparative perspective (i.e., the ability to discern similarities and differences among individuals at different life stages, between individuals, between social groups within a society, between societies, and between historical periods).
  3. To develop an understanding and awareness of important issues in the social sciences and to comprehend debates about the relational, cultural, historical, and natural contexts that shape the human experience.
  4. To provide perspectives of different disciplines on important issues in the social sciences.

Credits:

3 credits

Maximum Class Size:

To be determined.

Prequisites:

None

Content:

This course will not emphasize the acquisition of facts nor will it be an introduction to a specific discipline. Material will be selected based on its importance, interest value, coherence, and relevance to the course objectives. The course will focus on how social sciences view (analyze/approach) the world and current issues. It will provide students of non-Western as well as Western society.

Pedagogy:

  1. Students will be required to complete writing assignments.
  2. Students will be required to complete quantitative reasoning assignments.
  3. Students will be required to participate in collaborative activities.
  4. Students will develop their information literacy skills, including an understanding of the nature, organization, and methods of access and evaluation of both electronic and traditional resources in the subject area.
  5. Opportunities will be provided for discussion.
  6. The course proposal will include ways to access achievement of the objectives for this course.

Staffing:

Taught by faculty. The appropriate number of teaching assistants should be provided.

Approval Process:

Departments desiring to offer sections of integrated courses will submit course syllabi to the Director of University Studies. The faculty Social Sciences Committee will make the initial evaluation. The General Education Subcommittee and the Educational Policies Committee will make the final decision.

CRITERIA FOR APPROVED BREADTH COURSES: SOCIAL SCIENCES

  1. Courses must provide a broad and balanced perspective of a major discipline.
  2. Except for courses or examinations which are part of the University Studies Competency Requirements (see page 9), breadth courses must have no prerequisites.
  3. Courses should be offered at least once every school year.

Specific Criteria: Social Science

In evaluating courses for the Social Sciences approved list, the factors listed below will be considered. Not all of these criteria must be met for course approval, but together they suggest what a "strong" course proposal should include.

  1. The course should promote the following student learning goals:
    • Ability to understand the nature, history, theories, and methods of the social sciences.
    • Ability to comprehend debates about the relational, cultural, historical, and natural contexts that shape the human experience.
    • Development of a comparative perspective, i.e., the ability to discern similarities and differences among individuals at different life stages, between individuals, between social groups within a society, between societies, and between historical periods.
  2. The course should include topics relating to internationalization, multiculturalism, and diversity.
  3. The course should help students to understand and evaluate original sources, e.g., original writings and/or presentations of data.
  4. The course should require students to:
    • Complete writing assignments.
    • Participate in collaborative activities.
  5. The course should further the development of information literacy skills, including an understanding of the nature, organization, and methods of access and evaluation of both electronic and traditional resources in the subject area.
  6. The course should provide opportunities for discussion.
  7. The course proposal should include ways to assess achievement of the specific criteria listed above for this breadth area.

Approval Process:

Departments will be asked to recommend courses by submitting course syllabi. The initial evaluation of courses will be made by a faculty Social Sciences Committee. The final decision will be made by the General Education Subcommittee and Educational Policies Committee. Unless a department can provide strong justification, not more than one course from a department will be placed on the approved list.

USU 1350 Integrated Life Science

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Objectives:

  1. To improve students' understanding of science as a process and promote their ability to apply scientific methods of investigation.
  2. To provide a fundamental understanding of the unifying principles of the life sciences.
  3. To examine the historical contexts of life science, the evolution of the life sciences, their impact on society, the impact of society on the life sciences, and how society and life sciences are linked.
  4. To help students evaluate the historical, social, and ethical contexts of life science issues.

Credits:

3 credits

Maximum Class Size:

To be determined

Prerequisites:

None

Content:

The course will focus on the basic unifying concepts of the life sciences. Among the topics to be covered will be heredity and evolution, genetic continuity and reproduction, chemical and physical components and processes of life, and the human role in and impact on the biosphere, including the importance of biodiversity and sustainability of ecosystems. The course will emphasize how modeling, prediction, and observation lead to credible evidence, the contingent character of scientific knowledge, the use of technology in developing an understanding of the life sciences, and how that technology and its discoveries impact our daily lives, and that scientific discovery occurs within an ethical, historical and social context.

Pedagogy:

  1. Students may be required to complete writing assignments.
  2. Students may be required to participate in collaborative activities.
  3. Students will develop their information literacy skills, including an understanding of the nature, organization, and methods of access and evaluation of both electronic and traditional resources in the life sciences.
  4. Opportunities will be provided for discussion.
  5. The course proposal will include ways to assess achievement of the objectives for this course.

Staffing:

Taught by faculty. The appropriate number of teaching assistants will be provided.

Approval Process:

Departments desiring to offer sections of integrated life science courses will submit course syllabi to the Provost's Office, UMC 1435. The initial evaluation will be made by the faculty Life and Physical Sciences Committee. The final decision will be made by the General Education Subcommittee and the Educational Policies Committee.

CRITERIA FOR APPROVED BREADTH COURSES: LIFE SCIENCES

  1. The course should improve student's understanding of science as a process and promote their ability to apply scientific methods of investigation.
  2. The course should provide a fundamental understanding of the unifying principles of life science including: evolution, genetic continuity and reproduction, chemical and physical components and processes of life, behavior, interactions with the environment, and growth and development.
  3. The course should assist students in understanding the human role in and impact on the biosphere, including the importance of biodiversity and sustainability of ecosystems.
  4. The course should help students understand the role of technology as a factor that affects the development of life science and brings life science knowledge to our daily lives.
  5. The course should consider the historical, social, and ethical contexts of life science issues.
  6. The course should assist students in making informed decisions about personal and social issues related to life sciences (human biology component).
  7. The course should promote inquiry and teach problem solving skills and hypothesis formulation and testing.
  8. The course should help students to understand and evaluate original sources, e.g., original writings and/or presentations of data.
  9. The course should include laboratory, field, data analysis, and/or computer simulation experiences.
  10. The course should require students to: a. Complete writing assignments; b. Participate in collaborative activities; c. Use quantitative reasoning methods.
  11. This course should further the development of information literacy skills, including an understanding of the nature, organization, and method of access and evaluation of both electronic and traditional resources in the subject area.
  12. The course should provide opportunities for discussion.
  13. The course proposal should include ways to assess achievement of the specific criteria listed above for this breadth area.

USU 1360 Integrated Physical Science

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Click here for example syllabi
Click here for sample information literacy assignments and activities

Objectives:

  1. To improve students' understanding of science as a process and promote their ability to apply scientific methods of investigation.
  2. To provide a fundamental understanding of the unifying principles of the physical sciences.
  3. To examine the historical contexts of science, the evolution of science, its impact on society, the impact of society on the physical sciences, and how society and science are linked.
  4. To help students evaluate the historical, social, and ethical contexts of science issues.

Credits:

3 credits

Maximum Class Size:

To be determined

Prequisites:

None

Content:

The course will focus on the basic unifying concepts of the physical sciences. Among the topics to be covered will the structure of matter (from the atom to the earth to the universe, stressing the relevant associated length and time scales), the equivalence of mass and energy and their conservation in all known processes, and the magnitude and character of forces of nature. The course will emphasize how modeling, prediction, and observation lead to credible evidence, the contingent character of scientific knowledge, the use of mathematics and technology for describing the physical world, how that technology and its discoveries impact our daily lives, and that scientific discovery occurs within an ethical, historical and social context.

Pedagogy:

  1. Students may be required to complete writing assignments.
  2. Students may be required to complete a quantitative reasoning assignment.
  3. Students may be required to participate in collaborative activities.
  4. Students will develop their information literacy skills, including an understanding of the nature, organization, and methods of access and evaluation of both electronic and traditional resources in the physical sciences.
  5. Opportunities will be provided for discussion.
  6. The course proposal will include ways to assess achievement of the objectives for this course.

Staffing:

Taught by faculty. The appropriate number of teaching assistants will be provided.

Approval Process:

Departments desiring to offer sections of integrated physical science courses will submit course syllabi to the Provost's Office, UMC 1435. The initial evaluation will be made by the faculty Life and Physical Sciences Committee. The final decision will be made by the General Education Subcommittee and the Educational Policies Committee.

CRITERIA FOR APPROVED BREADTH COURSES: PHYSICAL SCIENCES

  1. The course should improve student's understanding of science as a process and promote their ability to apply scientific methods of investigation.
  2. The course should provide a fundamental understanding of the unifying principles of physical science.
  3. The course should assist students in understanding the human role in and impact on the physical environment.
  4. The course should help students understand the role of technology as a factor that affects the development of physical science and brings physical science knowledge to our daily lives.
  5. The course should consider the historical, social, and ethical contexts of physical science issues.
  6. The course should assist students in making informed decisions about personal and social issues related to physical sciences (human component).
  7. The course should promote inquiry and teach problem solving skills and hypothesis formulation and testing.
  8. The course should help student to understand and evaluate original sources, e.g., original writings and/or presentations of data.
  9. The course should include laboratory, field, data analysis, and/or computer simulation experiences.
  10. The course should require students to: a. Complete writing assignments; b. Participate in collaborative activities; c. Use quantitative reasoning methods.
  11. This course should further the development of information literacy skills, including an understanding of the nature, organization, and method of access and evaluation of both electronic and traditional resources in the subject area.
  12. The course should provide opportunities for discussion.
  13. The course proposal should include ways to assess achievement of the specific criteria listed above for this breadth area .


Integrated courses will be taught by instructors from a variety of departments and may be team-taught. Student credit hours for each section will be attributed to the department, which provides the lead instructor for the section.

Although the specific content of these courses may vary somewhat, depending on the individual instructor, the criteria found on the following pages will be used to evaluate proposed sections of the integrated breadth courses.