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Sexual Assault & Anti-Violence Information

FAQ

What can SAAVI do for me?

What can SAAVI do for me?

When sexual assault or hurtful relationships happen, it can be a confusing time. SAAVI is a safe and confidential place to come and figure out what to do next. We are here to...

  • Support those who experience sexual assault or other hurtful relationships
  • Support family and friends
  • Give you permission to feel what you feel
  • Make sure questions get answered
  • Educate about common effects of sexual assault and hurtful relationships
  • Explain your rights, choices, and options
  • Connect you to resources (counseling, medical help, academic assistance, etc.)
  • [If you choose to work with police or prosecution] Offer support during investigation/trial process

Is SAAVI only for women?

Is SAAVI only for women?

No. SAAVI is available to both women and men, whether you're interested in figuring out how to help a friend, or get help for yourself.

Is SAAVI only for students?

Is SAAVI only for students?

No. SAAVI is available to all members of campus: students, faculty, and staff. We are here for you, whether you want to help a friend or get help for yourself.

If I go to SAAVI because something happened to me, will a report be made to police?

If I go to SAAVI because something happened to me, will a report be made to police?

NO. When you visit SAAVI, your visit is CONFIDENTIAL. Making a police report is a personal decision. If you choose to report to police, we can help you.

BUT there are exceptions to this rule. Under the following circumstances, SAAVI is REQUIRED BY LAW to make a report to the police or the local Department of Child and Family Services:

  • If the survivor is under the age of 18
  • If violence was witnessed by a child under the age of 18
  • If an individual discloses a current situation of child or elder abuse
  • An individual demonstrates harm to her/himself or others

If you decide to report to police, or the situation requires a report be made, know that the USU Police Department, as well as other local policing agencies, have many wonderful and caring officers ready to assist.

If I decide to report to Police, what happens next?

If I decide to report to Police, what happens next?

That depends largely on you. You have several choices when it comes to reporting, and each choice has a different outcome:

Police can document your experience (with the understanding that no investigation or further action will be taken)

Police can document your experience and interview the suspect (no further action will be taken beyond this interview, and the suspect will be notified to have no contact with you), or

Police can conduct a full investigation and prepare your case for screening by the County Attorney for possible prosecution.

If you are interested in talking to police, but are not comfortable with a full investigation and possible prosecution, simply documenting your experience can be beneficial because:

  • Your report will give police a more accurate picture of what is happening in our area.
  • Your report may help police keep a running tab on regular sexual perpetrators.
  • You may decide at a later date that you want police to investigate/prosecute. The details of the event will have been recorded and time-sensitive information will have been collected.

To learn more about your reporting options, click here to read "Making the Decision to Report."

Do I have other reporting options besides talking to police?

Do I have other reporting options besides talking to police?

Yes. If the person who hurt you is a student on campus, you have two other options (whether or not you make a report to police):

  • Student of Concern Report. USU takes safety seriously; the university cares deeply about the well-being of its students, faculty, staff, and visitors. Reports sent through this system go directly to the VP of Student Services and the university Behavioral Intervention Team (BIT); all information is kept confidential. These reports can be made anonymously, and for documentation purposes only (in other words, the team will create a file on the incident, but no action will be taken). Even when a report is requested to be documentation only, it allows BIT to track concerning behavior and better understand what is happening on campus. SAAVI can submit anonymous reports on behalf students, faculty, and staff.
  • Office of Student Conduct. The Office of Student Conduct has several goals and responsibilities, including protecting the learning and living environment at USU, and resolving Student Code violations and grievances. If another student hurts you (rape, sexual assault, hurtful relationships, stalking, etc.), that person has violated the student code, and you have the right to make a report. All matters that are reported to this office are handled confidentially and sensitively. Student Conduct oversees disciplinary hearings for students who violate the Student Code. These proceedings are confidential, and only those directly involved are invited to attend. If appropriate (regardless of whether or not there is a related criminal court case) the offending student can be punished and/or removed from campus.

If the person who hurt you is staff or faculty at USU SAAVI can assist in reporting to Police, the AA/EO Office, or the Campus Judicial Officer if you choose.

Can I get on-going counseling at the SAAVI Office?

Can I get on-going counseling at the SAAVI Office?

The SAAVI Coordinator and SAAVI Intern both counsel with individuals as they decide what to do in the aftermath of violence. In some circumstances, the SAAVI Coordinator provides short term individual and group support therapy. Survivors of any kind of violence are entitled to an on-campus or community referral for on-going therapy dealing with trauma resolution.