Arts & Humanities

Logan High School Students Share Perspectives Through Art

By Allyson Myers |

"Glazed Apples," a painting by Logan High School student Laura Strong.

The Lyndsley Wilkerson Gallery, part of the Sorenson Legacy Foundation Center for Clinical Excellence, is proud to present an online gallery featuring art by Logan High School students.

Logan High art teachers Jeff Ashcroft and Roger Rigby understand the importance of the arts. In their teaching, they strive to help students discover their own passions, talents, and identities. Even in the face of difficult circumstances, Ashcroft and Rigby are continuing to support the self-expression of their students.

“One aspect of the work our students are doing that I find really interesting, satisfying and sometimes challenging, is how they each find their own voice,” said Ashcroft. “I try to teach the fundamentals and support them in their search of meaningful art. Their job is to practice, and in the process, they find their own voices and their own styles.” 

Many of the students echo the idea that art is valuable as a means of self-expression and connection. 

“Art has always been important to me because it allows me to be vulnerable and express my thoughts and emotions,” said student Thaylla Rocha. “I feel that, with my art, I can share how I perceive the world around me.”

A collection of student work was prepared for display in the Lyndsley Wilkerson Gallery to highlight and celebrate the varied and vibrant self-expression of students. With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, however, many buildings on USU campus were closed to public events, preventing the exhibit from opening as planned.

With the help of technology and the support of their teachers, these student artists still have the opportunity to present their art to the community. The full exhibit is now available to view online as a digital photo gallery.

Despite the change in venue, the students continue to affirm the value of sharing and creating art, especially during times of uncertainty and distress. Emily Rincon has found herself putting more effort and creativity into her work while staying in quarantine.

“Photography has played a major role in helping me get out of the depression I fell into during these rough times,” she said. “COVID-19 has helped me find a greater appreciation for my surroundings and artwork, which has inspired me to continue creating.”

The students’ teachers have also found solace and hope in continuing to create. “In this current crisis, art has helped me with my own mental health,” said Rigby. “I have found that as I have focused on creating art, I have been able to maintain a positive outlook.”

Though the current situation continues to be uncertain, these young artists will continue to find gratitude and opportunities to share their perspectives through art. As student Lilyan Lujan stated, “COVID-19 has impacted my art in many ways, one of the biggest being learning not to take anything for granted.”

The Logan High School student gallery is available at https://cehs.usu.edu/logan-high-gallery.
 

"Look, Stranger," by Logan High School Student Emma Larese-Casanova.

WRITER

Allyson Myers
Public Relations and Marketing Assistant
Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services
allyson.myers@usu.edu

CONTACT

Rebecca Dixon
Director, Public Relations and Marketing
Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services
435-797-1463
rebecca.dixon@usu.edu


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Community 298stories Arts 77stories Logan 68stories Exhibitions 47stories K-12 36stories

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