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Woody Plants of Utah
Renée Van Buren
Janet G. Cooper
Leila M. Shultz
and Kimball T. Harper

6x9, 528 pages, color

Published: 2011

ISBN 978-0-87421-824-4
paper $41.95

ISBN 978-0-87421-825-1
e-book $33.95

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Renée Van Buren

Received B.S. degree from Brigham Young University 1981, Botany. Taught public school in the state of Utah 1981-87. Received M.S. degree, Brigham Young University 1989, Botany. Ph.D. from Arizona State University, 1993, Botany. Post-doc 1993-95 Brigham Young University. Faculty, Utah Valley University 1995-present teaching Flora of Utah, Introduction to Biology, Introduction to Grasses, Wildland Shrubs, Honor's Biology, and Conservation Biology. Director of Capitol Reef Field Station operated by Utah Valley University 2008-present. Research interests include woody plants of Utah and Utah rare plant biology studies of the state.

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Leila M. Shultz

Research Professor Emeritus in the Department of Wildland Resources at Utah State University. She was curator of the Intermountain Herbarium for the first 20 years of her professional career where she worked to build the collection and explore remote areas of Utah. As Research Professor in the College of Natural Resources, she has worked on a number of large-scale interdisciplinary projects to document biodiversity in Utah. She is considered an authority on the taxonomy of sagebrush (Artemisia) and geography of the Utah flora. She currently serves on the Flora of North America executive committee.

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Janet G. Cooper

Received BA in Biology, San Jose State University, 1964. Taught outdoor education for the Santa Clara, Santa Cruz and Monterey School Districts for seven years and served as Assistant Principal the last three years at Redwood Glen in the Santa Cruz mountains. Did graduate work at Brigham Young University. Danforth Foundation Fellow 1976 to pursue Ph.D. at Arizona State University. Taught for over 30 years at Provo High School; Advanced Placement Biology, Botany, Honor's Biology, General Biology, Ecology, Natural History of Utah and several summer field courses. During her teaching career received dozens of awards for teaching excellence and service. Retired in 1999 and now resides in Woodland Hills Utah.

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Kimball T. Harper

Harper, passed away as this book was going to press. He received a B.S. Brigham Young University, 1958-Agronomy; M.S. Brigham Young University, 1960-Botany; Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, 1963-Botany. Faculty, University of Utah, 1963-1973; Faculty, Brigham Young University 1976-1996; Botany Scholar in Residence, Utah Valley University, 2000-present. Recipient of the Phi Kappa Phi Faculty Achievement Award, Brigham Young University, 1985; the prestigious Karl G. Maeser Distinguished Faculty Lecture Award, Brigham Young University, 1994; Karl G. Maeser Excellence in Research and Creative Arts Award, Outstanding Teacher Award, President's Pubic Service Award by The Nature Conservancy, American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow. Published hundreds of articles in professional journals and coauthored several books and book chapters. Mentored dozens of graduate students who are now contributing scientists in their various fields.

Woody Plants of Utah

A Field Guide with Identification Keys to Native and Naturalized Trees, Shrubs, Cacti, and Vines

Renée Van Buren
Janet G. Cooper
Leila M. Shultz
and Kimball T. Harper

The authors have done a good job writing for amateur botanists (or in their words "hobby naturalists and curious wanderers") and professionals as well. The book is packed with information about Utah's fantastic flora. I enjoyed reading its comments. The etymology of scientific names added value and the glossary read well. The taxonomy is current from my perspective.

—Noel H. Holmgren, Senior Curator of Botany, Emeritus, New York Botanical Garden and Coauthor of Intermountain Flora: Vascular Plants of the Intermountain West

A comprehensive guide that includes a vast range of species and plant communities and employs thorough, original keys. Based primarily on vegetative characteristics, the keys don't require that flowers or other reproductive features be present, like many plant guides. And this guide's attention to woody plants as a whole allows one to identify a much greater variety of plants. That especially suits an arid region such as Utah with less diverse native trees. Woody plants are those that have stems that persist above ground even through seasons that don't favor growth, due to low precipitation or temperatures.

Woody Plants of Utah employs dichotomous identification keys that are comparable to a game of twenty questions. They work through a process of elimination by choosing sequential alternatives.

Detailed, illustrated plant descriptions complement the keys and provide additional botanical and environmental information in relation to a useful introductory categorization of Utah plant communities. Supplementary tools include photos, distribution maps, and an illustrated glossary.