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About the Dead
Travis Mossotti
5.5 x 8.5, 88 pages

Published: 2011

ISBN 978-0-87421-826-8
cloth $19.95 (out of print)

ISBN 978-0-87421-827-5
paper $15.95

ISBN 978-0-87421-828-2
e-book $16.95

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Travis Mossotti received a BA in English and French from Webster University and an MFA in poetry from Southern Illinois University–Carbondale. Recently a faculty lecturer at the University of California—Santa Cruz, his poetry appears widely in literary journals, including American Literary Review, Another Chicago Magazine, Cream City Review, New York Quarterly, Passages North, RHINO, Southern Humanities Review, and many others. Mossotti was awarded the James Hearst Poetry Prize from the North American Review in 2009, and "Decampment," the opening poem to About the Dead, was adapted to screen in 2010 as an animated short film (www.decampment.com). Mossotti currently resides in St. Louis with his wife, Regina.

May Swenson Poetry Award Winner 2011

About the Dead

Travis Mossotti
foreword by Garrison Keillor

About the Dead struck me on first reading as an adventurous book grounded in real places and real people, and reading it was like following the poet up a steep climb on a rocky slope as he improvised his route, and at every step I was struck by the rightness of his choices, surprised by so many odd words that seemed so exactly right.
—Garrison Keillor

Listen to Keillor read Mossotti's poem "Crossing
the Gap"

Travis Mossotti writes with humor, gravity, and humility about subjects grounded in a world of grit, where the quiet mortality of working folk is weighed. To Mossotti, the love of a bricklayer for his wife is as complex and simple as life itself: "ask him to put into words what that sinking is, / that shudder in his chest, as he notices / the wrinkles gathering at the corners of her mouth." But not a whiff of sentiment enters these poems, for Mossotti has little patience for ideas of the noble or for sympathetic portraits of hard-used saints. His vision is clear, as clear as the memory of how scarecrows in the rearview, "each of them, stuffed / into a body they didn't choose, resembled / your own plight." His poetry embraces unsanctimonious life with all its wonder, its levity, and clumsiness. About the Dead is an accomplished collection by a writer in control of a wide range of experience, and it speaks to the heart of any reader willing to catch his "drift, and ride it like the billowed / end of some cockamamie parachute all the way / back to the soft, dysfunctional, waiting earth."