COVID-19 & Financial Aid FAQs

Q. What about SNAP Benefits?

The Consolidated Appropriations Act 2021, temporarily expands SNAP eligibility to include students enrolled at least half-time in an institution of higher education, who either:

  1. Are eligible to participate in state or federally financed work study during the regular school year, as determined by the institution of higher education, or
  2. Have an expected family contribution (EFC) of $0 in the current academic year.
  3. More Information

Q. Is the Financial Aid Office still open?

Yes, we are currently open to walk-in traffic. More Information.

Q. Can I still schedule an appointment with my financial aid counselor?

Yes! Our counselors are happy to answer any questions. We are currently taking phone and zoom appointments and may be able to help you over WebEx.

Q. What happens to my financial aid if I withdraw from a class?

To avoid paying back any federal grants, our staff will check your Canvas records to verify that you participated academically in the course you withdrew from. If your course doesn't use Canvas, we will try to contact your instructor. You may also be able to document that you participated academically in your course to avoid repayment. We have until the end of summer semester to verify participation.

If you are on financial aid warning or probation, dropping a class may result in suspension of financial aid for spring semester. Please check with the Financial Aid Office if you are on warning or probation.

Dropping or withdrawing from classes will affect your academic progress, and you will receive a W "grade" for each withdrawn class on your transcript. Getting too many W's on your transcript could result in financial aid warning. Please work closely with your instructors to review all of your options.

Dropping below half-time enrollment (6 credits) may cause older loans to enter repayment immediately (if you have used up your six-month grace period).

If you drop or fail all of your classes this semester, you may be required to repay some of your financial aid. More information here.

Q. I need to stop attending this term, what do I do about my financial aid?

To drop all of your classes this term, you should visit https://www.usu.edu/sots/loa to get started. Our office will then determine how much financial aid you need to return and notify you by mail. For federal Pell grants, you may need to document that you participated academically in your classes. This may reduce how much money has to be returned.

Please note that withdrawing from classes will affect your satisfactory academic progress towards graduation and you may be required to return some of your federal aid. However, dropping courses may be in your overall best interest. We recommend consulting with your financial aid counselor about your options.

Dropping below half-time enrollment (6 credits) may cause older loans to go into repayment immediately (if you have used up your six-month grace period).

Q. Should I drop all my classes?

It depends. If you can continue online, we recommend finishing and passing your classes. Even if you can only remain in one or two classes online, you may be able to avoid financial aid repayment or financial aid warning/suspension. Please work closely with your instructors to review all of your options before withdrawing from Spring semester 2020.

Q. I dropped my classes during the spring 2020 semester for reasons related to the Covid-19 pandemic and had to repay my federal aid. Can I get some of that money back?

A. We are committed to helping students that were directly affected by Covid-19. Please schedule an appointment with your financial aid counselor to review your financial options related to your spring 2020 complete withdrawal.

Q. What happens if I fail a class?

To avoid paying back any federal grants, our staff will check your Canvas records to verify that you participated academically in the course you received an "F" grade in. If your course doesn't use Canvas, we will try to contact your instructor. You may also be able to document that you participated academically in your course to avoid repayment. We have until the end of the summer semester to verify participation in failed classes.

If you are on financial aid warning or probation, failing a class may result in suspension of financial aid for spring semester. Please check with the financial aid office if you are on warning or probation. Please work closely with your instructors to review all of your options.

If you drop or fail all of your classes this semester, you may be required to repay some of your financial aid. More information here.

Q. How do I make sure I don't lose my financial aid?

To keep your aid, you must meet the total institution GPA and credit requirements. Review USU Financial Aid's updated Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy.

Q. My spring semester study abroad was just canceled. What happens to my aid?

USU Global Engagement is working with students to get them into other credits this semester. Please contact their office if you have any concerns, (435) 797-1124. If you cannot register for additional credits, you may have to return your federal aid.

Q. What would happen if I change all my classes to Pass/Fail?

It depends. If you are on warning or probation, changing all or some of your classes to Pass/Fail could prevent you from getting back into good standing or even result in suspension if there is no grade point average (GPA). We recommend consulting with your financial aid counselor about your options.

Q. What about student loan repayment and interest for students, borrowers, and parents?

08/06/2021 – The U.S. Department of Education (Department) announced a final extension of the pause on student loan repayment, interest, and collections until January 31, 2022. The Department believes this additional time and a definitive end date will allow borrowers to plan for the resumption of payments and reduce the risk of delinquency and defaults after restart. The Department will continue its work to transition borrowers smoothly back into repayment, including by improving student loan servicing.

Please note that some FFEL Program loans are owned by commercial lenders, and some Perkins Loans are owned by the institution you attended. These loans may not eligible for this benefit at this time. Please contact your loan servicer directly about your repayment options.

https://www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/biden-administration-extends-student-loan-pause-until-january-31-2022
https://studentaid.gov/announcements-events/coronavirus
More information on forbearance

Other Resources

Other Frequently Asked Questions

Updated 08 September 2021