Seminar Series

Seminars are held in LSB 133 from 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm unless otherwise noted

2021 - 2022 Speaker Bios

Beth Rose Middleton Manning
Beth Rose Middleton Manning

September 15 - 16, 2021
Professor, UC Davis Department of Native American Studies

Dr. Beth Rose Middleton Manning (Afro-Caribbean, Eastern European) is a Professor of Native American Studies at UC Davis. Beth Rose’s research centers on Native environmental policy and Native activism for site protection using conservation tools. Her broader research interests include intergenerational trauma and healing, rural environmental justice, indigenous analysis of climate change, Afro-indigeneity, and qualitative GIS.

Margaret Walls
Margaret Walls

October 20 - 21, 2021
Environmental Economist and Senior Fellow at Resources for the Future

Dr. Margaret Walls’s current research focuses on issues related to resilience and adaptation to extreme events, ecosystem services, and conservation, parks and public lands. Walls’s work on resilience assesses the factors that affect household location decisions in coastal areas, how individuals perceive flood risks, and how risk perceptions affect adaptation decisions. She has estimated the value of natural lands—such as wetlands—in providing protection from hurricanes and flooding, and is assessing the extent to which hurricanes affect U.S. migration patterns.

Merav Ben-David
Merav Ben-David

November 10 - 11, 2021
Professor of Zoology and Physiology
University of Wyoming

My main interest revolves around the interaction between animal behavioral ecology, population dynamics, and ecosystem function. I mainly study carnivores and use the transport of nutrient from sea to land as a model system. To study those interactions, I use isotopic and genetic tracers. For example, I investigate the effects of trade-off between nutritional requirements and risk of infanticide on consumption of salmon by female brown bears, and how female decisions made based on this trade-off influence the transfer of salmon-derived nutrients to terrestrial vegetation.

Christopher Roos
Christopher Roos

December 8 - 9, 2021
Professor of Anthropology
Southern Methodist University

I am an environmental archaeologist and Professor of Anthropology at Southern Methodist University. I received my MA and PhD from the University of Arizona (2002 and 2008) and my BA from the University of Cincinnati (2000). My primary areas of interest and expertise are in human pyrogeography and behavioral geoarchaeology. For more than a decade, I have been directing interdisciplinary research projects on the long-term interactions of human societies, climate, and wildfire in the Southwest USA. More recently, I have expanded my fire work to include collaborative research projects in Montana and Fiji. I also work closely with archaeologists in the Southwest and the northern Great Plains to apply earth science methods and techniques to the reconstruction of spatial patterns of human behavior in ritual and domestic contexts.

Moises Exposito Alonso
Moises Exposito Alonso

January 26 - 27, 2022
Assistant Professor at Stanford University
Principal Investigator, Carnegie Institute for Science

Evolutionary geneticist Moises Exposito-Alonso investigates whether and how plants will evolve to keep pace with climate change by conducting large-scale ecological and genome sequencing experiments. He also develops computational methods to derive fundamental principles of evolution, such as how fast natural populations acquire new mutations and how past climates shaped continental-scale biodiversity patterns. His goal is to use these first principles and computational approaches to forecast evolutionary outcomes of populations under climate change to anticipate potential future biodiversity losses. Exposito-Alonso is also interested in developing genome engineering methods that can help species adapt instead of becoming extinct.

Tyler DesRoches
Tyler DesRoches

February 23 - 24, 2022
Assistant Professor of Sustainability and Human Well-Being
Assistant Professor of Philosophy
Arizona State University

C. Tyler DesRoches is Assistant Professor of Sustainability and Human Well-Being at the School of Sustainability and Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies at Arizona State University. He has a PhD in philosophy from the University of British Columbia and his areas of specialization include the history and philosophy of economics, human well-being and sustainability. Formerly, Tyler was a Forest Economist with Natural Resources Canada and a Sessional Lecturer in the Department of Philosophy and Vancouver School of Economics at the University of British Columbia.

Ambika Kamath
Ambika Kamath

March 16-17, 2022
Miller Postdoctoral Fellow,
University of California Berkeley
New faculty in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado Boulder

I’m a behavioral and evolutionary ecologist interested in social and socioecological interactions among individuals, and the impact of these interactions for evolution and for human understandings of nature. I use field-based techniques, close reading and conceptual inquiry, and mathematical modeling approaches to tackle specific questions tailored to different organisms’ unique natural histories.

Zakiya Leggett
Zakiya Leggett

April 20-21 2022
Assitant Professor, College of Natural Resources
North Carolina State University

Dr. Zakiya Leggett is a professor at North Carolina State University in the College of Natural Resources. She joined the faculty in 2016 but had previously served as an adjunct faculty member for several years. She currently teaches Introduction to Environmental Science and serves as the campus director for the Doris Duke Conservation Scholars (DDCS) Program. The DDCS program trains undergraduate students that are interested in research experiences in conservation issues as well as encouraging diversity in those fields.