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Native Americans of the Great Basin: Bear River Massacre Subject of Lecture


Tuesday, Apr. 09, 2013


 

 

Contact:

Museum of Anthropology

 

Utah State University

 

Phone: (435) 797-7545

 

E-Mail: anthro.museum@usu.edu

 

NATIVE AMERICANS OF THE GREAT BASIN: BEAR RIVER MASSACRE SUBJECT OF LECTURE

LOGAN - ason Brough, president of the Native American Student Council at Utah State University and a member of the Northwestern Band of the Shoshone, is a guest speaker April 13 at the USU Museum of Anthropology and its “Saturdays at the Museum Series.”
       

Brough brings his views, as well as his recent research, about the Bear River Massacre to the presentation. The Bear River Massacre occurred 150 years ago. 
       

His lecture begins at 1 p.m. at the museum. It is free and open to everyone.
       

Additional activities will be available on the hour throughout the day at the museum. A story time with books from the museum’s Great Basin teaching trunk begins at 11 a.m. At noon,  visitors can get physical by throwing an atlatl (spear-thrower) on the Quad and Brough’s presentation begins at 1 p.m. at the museum.
       

Following the lecture, guests can return to the Quad for more atlatl throwing and story time repeats at 3 p.m. 
       

Visitors can also make beaded necklaces and taste a cricket. Tours are available for the Great Basin and Basketry exhibits and new items from the updated teaching trunk will be on display. 
        

“The Great Basin is one of our most requested tours,” said Randi Martin, museum assistant. “Patrons from the valley can learn about the ancient past and how people used to live in a setting that is familiar to them. Plus, everyone has the opportunity to try a flavored cricket.”  
       

In addition to the “Saturdays at the Museum” activity series with its 10 a.m.-4 p.m. hours, community members and USU students alike can visit the museum during its standard operating hours, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 
       

Funding for Saturday events is provided by a grant from the United States Institute of Museum and Library Services. More information about the IMLS is available online (www.imls.gov).
       

The USU Museum of Anthropology can be found on the USU campus in the south turret of the historic Old Main building, Room 252. Admission is free. For Saturday activities, free parking is available in the adjacent lot, south of the building.
       

For more information about museum events, call museum staff at (435) 797-7545 or visit the museum website (anthromuseum.usu.edu).
       

The Museum of Anthropology is part of the Anthropology Program at USU in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. 

 

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