Science & Technology

USU College of Science Releases Spring 2020 Issue of 'Discovery' Alumni Magazine

By Mary-Ann Muffoletto |

Uyen Lam, right, with Mariar Tinshein, senior medical director of Myanmar's Mawlamyine General Hospital, pursues medical missions in southeast Asia. The Boston-area cardiologist is featured in the College of Science’s alumni magazine. Courtesy U. Lam.

Utah State University’s College of Science announces the release of the Spring 2020 issue of its Discovery alumni magazine. The full-color publication, featuring alumni stories, is published twice a year online and in print.

Theme of the Spring 2020 issue is “Reaching Out,” which features alumni involved in varied forms of community outreach, including Aggies pursuing COVID-19 pandemic responses.

“This issue of Discovery is filled with inspirational stories about remarkable Aggie achievements and commitments to outreach,” writes USU Science Dean Maura E. Hagan, in the magazine’s opening message. “An award-winning theoretical chemist in pursuit of work-life balance; a conservation biologist, who is also a children’s book author; new alumnae committed to sharing their passion for science and mathematics; an alum who thought he’d never go to college, who is using his skills to fight the pandemic and a Boston-based cardiologist engaged in international medical missions – it’s spirit-lifting to read these stories.”

Hagan adds a message of sympathy to alumni, who have been touched by tragedy during the pandemic.

“Some of you have lost loved ones to this unrelenting virus,” she writes. “I offer my heartfelt condolences to you and your families.”

Bradley Hintze (BS’09, Biochemistry), the 2008 recipient of the university’s Legacy of Utah State Award, penned the issue’s “From an Alum” column on the topic of “curiosity.” Hintze, who earned a doctoral degree in biochemistry from Duke University in 2015, is a senior data scientist with the Duke Institute for Health Innovation in Durham, North Carolina.

“I am currently working on a real-time dashboard that brings critical data regarding the COVID-19 pandemic to Duke Health leadership, allowing them to quickly respond to an ever-changing situation,” he says.

The issue’s feature story focuses on College of Science alumna Uyen Lam (BS’08, Biology and Public Health), a cardiologist in the Boston area, who graduated from the University of Utah School of Medicine in 2012. Since her medical school days, Lam has been involved in international medical relief missions to Vietnam and Myanmar.

“Initially, my interest in traveling to Vietnam was to learn more about my parents’ home country and my ancestors,” says the Cache Valley native, who graduated from Logan High School in 2004. “My initial medical mission trip opened my eyes to the tremendous needs in Vietnam and in other developing countries, starting with such basic needs as clean water and access to even minimal health care.”

At home in the United States, Lam serves as medical director of the Bernard D. Kosowsky, MD Cardiovascular Rehabilitation and Prevention Center at St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center, a Steward Family Hospital, in Brighton, Massachusetts. Along with Aggies throughout the world, Lam is watching the COVID-19 pandemic unfold.

“Our sister hospitals are pushing capacity with COVID-19 patients,” she says. “To date, we’ve only had a few COVID-19 patients in our facility, but we’ve noticed the (disease’s) shortness of breath and chest pain can mimic a heart attack.”

Lam stresses the need for everyone, across the United States, to stay home as much as possible.

“I urge Americans to take a hard look at (Italy), New York City and their own communities,” she says. “A civilized society exists on the premise that each person has a duty to protect themselves and others. Our rates of infection are increasing and we need to heed the danger. It will take all of us behaving responsibly to weather this pandemic.”

Bradley Hintze, with wife Anne Cherry, and sons, from left, Alden and Otto. A senior data scientist with North Carolina's Duke Institute for Health, Hintze is working on a real-time data dashboard to aid the COVID-19 pandemic response. Jared Lazarus.

WRITER

Mary-Ann Muffoletto
Public Relations Specialist
College of Science
435-797-3517
mary-ann.muffoletto@usu.edu

CONTACT

Mary-Ann Muffoletto
Public Relations Specialist
College of Science
435-797-3517
mary-ann.muffoletto@usu.edu



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