Employee Reporting Obligations

University employees have different obligations, depending on their job titles and duties, in how they are required to respond to disclosures of sexual misconduct. An employee's obligations are based on whether the employee is a designated confidential resource or reporting employee.

If you have questions about your designation or reporting obligations, please contact the USU Title IX Coordinator by emailing titleix@usu.edu or by calling 435-797-1266.

Flowchart detailing what happens to disclosures of sexual misconduct that are made to USU employees like housing and residence life staff, faculty members, university police, university advocates, university therapists, and university medical providers

Designated Confidential Resources

The university has designated medical professionals and medical staff, professional counselors, non-professional counselors, and advocates as confidential resources so individuals who have been impacted by sexual misconduct can have access to support services in a confidential setting. Information about sexual misconduct that is shared with designated confidential resources is not reported to the USU Title IX Coordinator.

Contact information for USU's designated confidential resources is available in the Sexual Misconduct Resource Guide.

A list of USU's designated confidential resources can be accessed via interim USU Policy 340.

Interim - Designated Confidential Resources Overview Handout

Reporting Employees

Some university employees are designated as reporting employees, which means they must report all information they receive about sexual misconduct to the USU Title IX Coordinator. Examples of reporting employees include provosts, deans, and department heads; faculty members; all positions in the Office of Equity; university police officers; all positions in Residence Life; directors in Student Affairs; most positions in the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards; athletic directors and coaches; supervisors of employees; and Campus Security Authorities.

A list of USU's reporting employees can be accessed via interim USU Policy 340.

Interim - Reporting Employee Overview Handout

Exceptions to Reporting Employee Reporting Obligations

A reporting employee’s obligations do not apply when the disclosure of sexual misconduct is made in the following circumstances:

  • The reporting employee is the claimant;
  • Human subject research, subject to the review of the University’s Institutional Review Board. For example, a survey to collect data about trauma given to participants that asks if they experienced sexual violence; 
  • A Pastoral Counselor who is associated with a religious order or denomination, recognized by that religious order or denomination as someone who provides confidential counseling, and is functioning within the scope of that recognition as a Pastoral Counselor; 
  • Privileged requests for legal advice;
  • A person who receives a disclosure while employed by or volunteers at a rape crisis center who has a minimum of 40 hours of training in counseling and assisting victims of sexual assault and who is under the supervision of the direct or designee of a rape crisis center;
  • Protected Health Information (PHI) generated by clinical care teams who are providing services subject to HIPAA that are designated as “Healthcare Provider Covered Components” in the University’s Hybrid Entity Declaration (clinical care teams include but are not limited to faculty, clinicians, student trainees, and support staff engaged in Covered Component work), except where such PHI may be evidence of sexual misconduct between a client or patient and a member of a clinical care team; or, 
  • A spouse, domestic partner, individuals living like domestic partners, dating partner, or family member by their spouse, domestic partner, dating partner, individuals living like domestic partners, or family member. 

There is no reporting obligation when the disclosure of sexual misconduct is made through or in the following circumstances unless the respondent is identified as a current student or employee:

  • A process advisor and/or support person serving in that role in an Office of Equity formal investigation or alternative resolution process;
  • Applications to the University or a specific program offered by the University; 
  • Certain designated care teams defined in USU Procedures 340 that routinely review health information and/or records pursuant to a limited release of information agreement;
  • Job applications and interviews;
  • University-led focus groups related to Sexual Misconduct; 
  • Sexual Misconduct prevention trainings provided by designated prevention specialists;  
  • Public awareness events; or,
  • Work submitted in course assignments and discussions related to course materials.

If the reporting employee is unsure whether to report the information to the USU Title IX Coordinator, they should err on the side of reporting the information. When an exception applies, reporting employees are still obligated to provide the individual with information about support services and various reporting options.

How Reporting Employees Should Respond to Sexual Misconduct Disclosures

If an individual discloses an incident of sexual misconduct to you, follow these steps:

1

Inform

Inform the individual as soon as possible that if they share information about sexual misconduct with you, you must submit a report about it to the USU Title IX Coordinator. Tell them that they will be contacted with information about support services and various additional reporting options.

If the individual isn't comfortable disclosing given your reporting obligations, be sure to refer them to the designated confidential resources listed on sexualrespect.usu.edu and inform them about how to file a report with the USU Title IX Coordinator at equity.usu.edu/report.

For example, you could say: "It sounds like you’re about to share something very important about sexual misconduct. Before you continue, I would like to let you know that I am a reporting employee, which means that I must relay all information I learn about sexual misconduct to the USU Title IX Coordinator. This does not mean that you have to go through a formal investigation with USU, but the USU Title IX Coordinator will explain support and other options available to you. Now that you know that I cannot keep this information between us, what would you like to have happen next?”

2

Listen

Listen without judgment if the individual would still like to discuss their experience with you. Respond with compassion, avoid questioning their experience or asking questions to learn more about what happened, and express your support.

3

Refer

Refer the support services and various additional reporting options listed at sexualrespect.usu.edu.

4

Report

Report all the information related to the disclosure at equity.usu.edu/report within 24 hours.

If you have questions or concerns about reporting, please contact the USU Title IX Coordinator by emailing titleix@usu.edu or by calling 435-797-1266.

Learn about how to respond to a sexual misconduct disclosure in a trauma-informed way on SAAVI’s website.

Employee Reporting Obligations Frequently Asked Questions

General FAQs

The purpose of this FAQ is to provide general answers to questions about USU’s employee sexual misconduct reporting obligations under interim USU Policy and Procedures 340: Required Reporting of Sexual Misconduct.

Designation-specific FAQs can be found for Reporting Employees and for Designated Confidential Resources in the next two sections. Non-designated employees (those who are not Reporting Employees or Designated Confidential Resources) can review the FAQs found here regarding best practices for responding to sexual misconduct disclosures.

Understanding Different Employee Obligations

All full-time and many part-time employees have been designated as either a Reporting Employee or Designated Confidential Resource. The lists of job titles and campus units that have been designated in each employee category can be accessed through Interim USU Policy 340. 

New full-time and applicable part-time employees will receive an email from the Office of Equity within their first 30 days of employment notifying them of their designation and training obligations. All employees will receive an email from the Office of Equity at the start of each fiscal year (by July 1) reminding them of their designation and annual training obligations. 

Employees who are not designated as Reporting Employees or Designated Confidential Resources do not have obligations under Interim USU Policy 340, but may have training requirements related to responding sexual misconduct.

Reporting Employees must report all information they receive about sexual misconduct to the USU Title IX Coordinator within 24 hours. 

Designated Confidential Resources do not report information about sexual misconduct to the USU Title IX Coordinator. 

These two employee designations are the only designations with a required response under USU Interim Policy and Procedures 340. Employees who are not designated in either of these categories receive training regarding how to respond to a disclosure of sexual misconduct and can help someone file a report.

You can learn more about your reporting obligations by visiting the Office of Equity’s Reporting Obligation website or by contacting the USU Title IX Coordinator, Hilary Renshaw, at 435-797-1266 or titleix@usu.edu.

All Designated Confidential Resources and Reporting Employees are required to participate in an annual training (once every fiscal year between July 1 and June 30) about their sexual misconduct reporting obligations. The reporting obligations trainings will be facilitated in person or virtually on Zoom. 

New employees are required to participate in a training within their first 30 calendar days of employment (Designated Confidential Resources) or first 60 calendar days of employment (Reporting Employees).  

Many non-designated employees are also required to participate in an annual training and in a training as a new employee (within their first 60 calendar days of employment) regarding best practices to responding to sexual misconduct at USU. A list of non-designated employees required to train can be accessed through Interim USU Policy 340. 

If your reporting obligations change, you will be contacted by the Office of Equity with information about the change and any additional training requirements. 

Recent Policy Changes

USU’s sexual misconduct policies and procedures follow federal laws and regulations, including Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. Policies and procedures will be updated as new federal laws and regulations are released. An update to Title IX regulations is expected within the next year (by summer 2023). 

Additionally, changes to USU policy and procedures reflect feedback from the campus community and an ongoing effort to provide clear expectations about reporting obligations. 

The Office of Equity updated USU Interim Policy and Procedures 340: Required Reporting of Sexual Misconduct on July 1, 2022. The changes to policy and procedures reflect feedback from the campus community and an ongoing effort to provide clear expectations about reporting obligations. 

Updates to USU Interim Policy and Procedures 340 include: 

  • Resource Connection Employees: The Office of Equity removed Resource Connection Employees as a designated category of employees. Additionally, certain employees were changed from Resource Connection Employees to Reporting Employees (including the Disability Resource Center staff, team leaders and crew leaders within facilities, academic advisors). 
    • Rationale: Under previous policy and procedures, Resource Connection Employees were required to offer resources and reporting options to individuals who disclosed incidents of sexual misconduct. The Office of Equity received feedback that there was confusion about what was required for employees under this designation. 
    • Next steps: Resource Connection Employees have been removed from the policy. Employees that are not designated as Reporting Employees or Designated Confidential Resources will participate in an annual sexual misconduct policy training online. Redesignated employees will be emailed about their Reporting Employee training requirement and reporting obligations. 
  • Exceptions to Reporting Obligations: The Office of Equity updated exceptions to Reporting Employee obligations. 
    • Rationale: While most exceptions remain the same, this update clarified that Reporting Employees must report - even if an exception applies - if the Respondent (person alleged to have engaged in sexual misconduct) is an employee or student. This was done to make sure the university responds appropriately if an individual within our campus community is allegedly engaging in sexual misconduct. 
    • Next steps: The updated exceptions will be incorporated into Reporting Employee trainings and handouts, as well as updated on the Office of Equity’s website.

Many university employees that were previously designated as Responsible Employees (and therefore required to report) no longer have a designation. This means they are not required to report information about sexual misconduct to the USU Title IX Coordinator. This shift is due to the Title IX regulations that were implemented by the US Department of Education in August 2020 that no longer required all employees at a university to report information about sexual misconduct to the university.  

The university wants individuals to know where they can go to report sexual misconduct and receive support, but also wants to give the individual more autonomy over where their information is shared. Many non-designated employees (including all full time non-designated employees) are required to attend training about how they should respond to disclosures of sexual misconduct.

While most exceptions to reporting obligations remain the same, the July 1, 2022 update clarified that Reporting Employees must report, even if an exception applies, if the respondent (person alleged to have engaged in sexual misconduct) is an employee or student. This change was made to ensure the university responds appropriately if an individual is allegedly engaging in sexual misconduct. Exceptions to reporting obligations can viewed in Interim USU Policy 340.

Designated Confidential Resource FAQs

This purpose of this FAQ guide is to assist Designated Confidential Resources in navigating their obligations in responding to sexual misconduct. If you are not a Designated Confidential Resource, these FAQs do not apply to you, but can help you better understand a Designated Confidential Resource’s obligations under interim USU Policy and Procedures 340: Required Reporting of Sexual Misconduct. 

Identifying Designated Confidential Resources

Designated Confidential Resources are identified in Interim USU Policy 340. The designation is based on your current position and department within the university.  

You will be notified by the Office of Equity if your designation changes. You can email prevention@usu.edu if you are unsure if you are a Designated Confidential Resource.

All Designated Confidential Resources are required to take an annual employee Title IX (sexual misconduct) training that has content specifically for Designated Confidential Resources. Review the employee training FAQs for more information about the training.

Responding to a Sexual Misconduct Disclosure as a Designated Confidential Resource

You do not report sexual misconduct (sexual harassment, sexual assault, relationship violence, or sex-based stalking) to the USU Title IX Coordinator, but you must provide an individual who discloses with information about support services and reporting options.  

There may be instances where you are not confidential and must report information to the USU Title IX Coordinator or other reporting entities. Review the exceptions to your confidentiality by reading through the remainder of these FAQs. 

You must also: 

  1. Inform the individual that you will keep the information they share about sexual misconduct confidential, and that their personally identifiable information will remain confidential. Be sure to also explain any relevant exceptions to your ability to keep information confidential, including data reporting requirements. All non-professional counselors must explain that their notes and information are not privileged and therefore may be discoverable in any legal action. 
  2. Notify the individual that their disclosure to you as a designated confidential resource will not be reported to the USU Title IX Coordinator or result in an Office of Equity response. Be sure to explain any reporting or information sharing exceptions, such as providing information for a timely warning notice to comply with the federal Clery Act.

You should tell someone during a conversation where they disclose to you that you’re a Designated Confidential Resource at USU. Let them know that you have legal confidentiality and will not report anything they tell you about sexual misconduct to the USU Title IX Coordinator. 

Remember to also inform them of any exceptions that apply to your confidentiality. 

You should follow the four steps outlined in the Designated Confidential Resources handout when you respond to a disclosure of sexual misconduct. Be sure to remain empathetic and validate them throughout. Do not question their experience or blame them for what happened. You can learn more about responding in a trauma-informed way here.

You should encourage someone to contact other resources that may be able to support them. A list of existing USU and community resources can be found at sexualrespect.usu.edu. Some of those resources include other Designated Confidential Resources and the USU Title IX Coordinator.

All employees have free and confidential access to the Sexual Assault and Anti-Violence Information Office (SAAVI) as a space to process your own experiences or someone else’s. You can also access the community resources listed on this website.

You should tell someone that because you’re confidential, you can’t report the information to the USU Title IX Coordinator. However, you can show them where to go to report the incident and even support them as they file a report or call the Office of Equity. 

You may also follow your office’s procedures related to a release of information. Contact your supervisor for more information. 

You cannot request supportive measures for another individual. You can direct them to the website where they can schedule an intake meeting to request supportive measures and support them while they schedule an intake. You can also direct the individual to visit an Office of Equity location in person (Old Main, room 161 at the Logan campus) or call the Office of Equity at 435-797-1266 to schedule a meeting to access supportive measures.

Designated Confidential Resource Reporting Obligations

Yes. Some employees who are Designated Confidential Resources may have different reporting obligations depending on the role they are serving in at the time of the disclosure of sexual misconduct. 

In limited circumstances, a Designated Confidential Resource may have reporting obligations. For example: 

  • A professional therapist in CAPS would not report a disclosure of sexual misconduct that an individual made during a therapy session. However, they would be required to report if they learned information concerning sexual misconduct that is alleged to have been committed by another Designated Confidential Resource. 
  • A Designated Confidential Resource who also serves in a role that designates them as a Reporting Employee (such as a course instructor, student organization advisor, or graduate assistant) is a Reporting Employee at all times except for when they’re working in the scope of the position that designates them as a Designated Confidential Resource. 
  • Supervisors who are Designated Confidential Resources are required to report any sexual misconduct involving the individuals they supervise.  

Review the rest of the FAQs for more information about what to report in these circumstances.

You are required to report information about sexual misconduct to the USU Title IX Coordinator at equity.usu.edu/report within 24 hours of receiving the disclosure. 

Your incident report must include all the information disclosed to you, including the following information:

  • The name of the person who experienced the sexual misconduct; 
  • The name of the person who reported the sexual misconduct to the designated confidential resource, if different from the person who experienced it; 
  • The name of the person(s) alleged to have engaged in sexual misconduct;  
  • The name of any witnesses or individuals who have information about the incident(s); 
  • The date, time, and location of the alleged incident(s); 
  • The nature of the incident(s);  
  • A description of the incident(s); 
  • All documentation the designated confidential resource has received related to the incident (including all written notes); 
  • The date the incident was reported to the designated confidential resource; and, 
  • All other relevant information known to the designated confidential resource.

When you learn of sexual misconduct involving any individuals you supervise, you are required to report as if you were a Reporting Employee (review the Reporting Employee FAQs below and Reporting Employee overview for more information).

This means:

  • You are required to report information about sexual misconduct to the USU Title IX Coordinator at equity.usu.edu/report within 24 hours of receiving the disclosure. 
  • The exceptions to reporting also apply. A full list of exceptions can be found Interim USU Policy 340. 

Your incident report must include all the information disclosed to you, including the following information:

  • The name of the person who experienced the sexual misconduct; 
  • The name of the person who reported the sexual misconduct to the designated confidential resource, if different from the person who experienced it; 
  • The name of the person(s) alleged to have engaged in sexual misconduct;  
  • The name of any witnesses or individuals who have information about the incident(s); 
  • The date, time, and location of the alleged incident(s); 
  • The nature of the incident(s);  
  • A description of the incident(s); 
  • All documentation the designated confidential resource has received related to the incident (including all written notes); 
  • The date the incident was reported to the designated confidential resource; and, 
  • All other relevant information known to the designated confidential resource.

Non-professional advocates in the Sexual Assault and Anti-Violence Information Office (SAAVI) do not directly report information about sexual misconduct to the USU Title IX Coordinator. 

However, non-professional advocates are considered Campus Security Authorities under the federal Clery Act and are required to report anonymous data about sexual misconduct incidents that occurred on Clery Geography to university police. University police are Reporting Employees, so they are required to then report that information to the USU Title IX Coordinator. 

The information that is reported to university police by non-professional advocates includes the date, time, and location of the incident. This report will not include the name of the individual that experienced the sexual misconduct. Anonymous data reports may result in a timely warning, additional security, and other general responses from the university. 

You should inform someone as soon as possible that an exception to your confidentiality applies, even if you need to interrupt them. Let them know that if they share information about sexual misconduct with you that falls under one of your exceptions to confidentiality, you must submit a report about it to the USU Title IX Coordinator and/or university police. Tell them that after a report is made to the USU Title IX Coordinator, they will be contacted with information about support services and various additional reporting options. 

If the individual isn’t comfortable disclosing given your exceptions to confidentiality, be sure to refer them to another Designated Confidential Resource listed on sexualrespect.usu.edu and inform them about how to file a report with the USU Title IX Coordinator at equity.usu.edu/report. 

An example of how to inform someone about your reporting obligations in an empathetic and validating way can be found here.

Reporting Employee FAQs

The purpose of this FAQ guide is to assist Reporting Employees in navigating their obligations in responding to sexual misconduct. If you are not a Reporting Employee, these FAQs do not apply to you, but can help you better understand a Reporting Employee’s obligations under interim USU Policy and Procedures 340: Required Reporting of Sexual Misconduct.

Identifying Reporting Employees

The list of Reporting Employees can be accessed through Interim USU Policy 340. Your designation is based on your current position and/or department within the university.  

You will be notified by the Office of Equity if your designation changes. You can email prevention@usu.edu if you are unsure if you are a Reporting Employee.

All Reporting Employees are required to take an annual “live” training that has content specifically for Reporting Employees. Review the employee training FAQs for more information about the training.

Yes. If one or more of your positions at USU designates you as a Reporting Employee, you are considered a Reporting Employee even when you’re not working within the role that designates you as a Reporting Employee.  

You can view the list of exceptions to your reporting obligations in Interim USU Policy 340. 

USU strives to create a learning and working environment free from sexual misconduct. Part of creating this environment means addressing and remediating incidents of discrimination, harassment, and sexual misconduct that affect campus community members. 

To ensure that the university can provide persons who have experienced sexual misconduct with supportive measures and information about resources, reporting options, including the option of filing a formal complaint, certain university employees are designated as Reporting Employees.

Responding to a Sexual Misconduct Disclosure as a Reporting Employee

You should inform someone as soon as possible that you’re a Reporting Employee, even if you need to interrupt them. Let them know that if they share information about sexual misconduct with you, you must submit a report about it to the USU Title IX Coordinator. Tell them that they will be contacted with information about supportive measures, reporting options, and the investigation process. 

If the individual isn’t comfortable disclosing given your reporting obligations, be sure to refer them to the designated confidential resources listed on sexualrespect.usu.edu and inform them about how to file a report with the USU Title IX Coordinator at equity.usu.edu/report. 

An example of how to inform someone of your obligations in an empathetic and validating way can be found here. 

You should follow the four steps outlined in the Reporting Employee handout when you respond to a disclosure. Be sure to remain empathetic and validate them throughout. Do not question their experience or blame them for what happened. You can learn more about responding in a trauma-informed way here.

USU has multiple free resources for anyone who experiences sexual misconduct. A full list of those resources can be found here. In addition to USU resources, you can also refer someone to community resources, which are also often free and confidential.  

If someone doesn’t want to access a resource, respect their choice. They know their situation best and resources may not be what they need in the moment. 

If you’re concerned about someone’s well-being, you can check in on them or contact Becca Seamons in Human Resources (for employees) at becca.seamons@usu.edu or the CARE team (for students) at so they can check in on them. 

When you check in on someone, be respectful and mindful of their boundaries. If they disclose anything else about the incident when you check on them, you will have to file another report with the USU Title IX Coordinator. When an individual first discloses to you, you can ask the individual if they would like you to check on them and how and when they would like you to check on them. 

You are required to report an incident of sexual misconduct to the USU Title IX Coordinator even if the person disclosing to you is the person who engaged in the sexual misconduct behavior(s). If you feel safe doing so, you’re encouraged to use Upstander strategies (direct, delegate, distract, delay, or document) to call out the behavior. While you don’t have to tell them you’re reporting the incident, be mindful that they may figure out who reported if you’re one of the only people they told or who witnessed the behavior(s). 

Retaliation is prohibited at USU and can be reported to the Office of Equity. It could be considered retaliation if you take action against individuals involved in the Office of Equity process. Please contact the Office of Equity if you have any questions. 

All employees have free and confidential access to the USU Sexual Assault and Anti-Violence Information Office (SAAVI) as a space to process your own experiences or someone else’s. You can also access the community resources listed on this website. The SAAVI office can also help you navigate how to inform someone you’re a Reporting Employee.

When to File a Report as a Reporting Employee

You are required to report any information about sexual misconduct if you learn of it through: 

  • A direct disclosure; or, 
  • A third-party disclosure, even in circumstances where you have limited information or are unsure what happened; or, 
  • Observing or witnessing an incident. 

The only instances where you are not required to report sexual misconduct is if an exception applies. You can view the list of exceptions to your reporting obligations in Interim USU Policy 340.

You should always err on the side of caution and report an incident even if you’re unsure if it’s considered sexual misconduct under USU policies. The Office of Equity will determine if the incident falls under Interim USU Policies 339, 339A, or 339B and refer the report to another office (such as Human Resources) as necessary. 

Sexual misconduct can be experienced by anyone (regardless of their identity) and can look like a lot of different behaviors. It includes sexual harassment, sexual assault, relationship violence, and sex-based stalking. You can learn more about these behaviors here 

The Office of Equity is here to support you with any questions you may have.  Email titleix@usu.edu or call 435-797-1266 if you are unsure if you should report something.

Reporting Employees who fail to report an incident of sexual misconduct could face disciplinary action, up to and including termination. If you fail to report an incident within 24 hours, please report it as soon as possible. 

The Office of Equity is here to support you with any questions you may have.  Email titleix@usu.edu or call 435-797-1266 if you’re unsure if you should report something. 

Filing a Report as a Reporting Employee

You are required to report information about sexual misconduct to the USU Title IX Coordinator at equity.usu.edu/report within 24 hours of receiving the disclosure. 

Your incident report must include all the information disclosed to you, including the following information: 

  • The name of the person who experienced the sexual misconduct; 
  • The name of the person who reported the sexual misconduct to the Reporting Employee, if different from the person who experienced it; 
  • The name of the person(s) alleged to have engaged in sexual misconduct;  
  • The name of any witnesses or individuals who have information about the incident(s); 
  • The date, time, and location of the alleged incident(s); 
  • The nature of the incident(s);  
  • A description of the incident(s); 
  • All documentation the Reporting Employee has received related to the incident (including all written notes); 
  • The date the incident was reported to the Reporting Employee; and, 
  • All other relevant information known to the Reporting Employee.

Though you often have mentoring and other close relationships with colleagues and students, as a Reporting Employee, you may not promise confidentiality of the information that is shared to you. 

Yes. You are required to report an incident to the USU Title IX Coordinator with 24 hours of learning of an incident. The USU Title IX Coordinator will still take action if your report is made outside of the 24-hour timeframe but reporting quickly ensures the Office of Equity can respond most effectively to any potential safety concerns.

Yes. The time Reporting Employees spend filing the sexual misconduct incident report will be considered “on the clock” time and can be covered by comp time for non-exempt employees. Please contact your supervisor or Human Resources if you have questions about compensation for your time filing a report.

No. You cannot report anonymously as a Reporting Employee. This is for accountability purposes and so the Office of Equity knows who we can contact if we have questions about the report.

You should file a report online at equity.usu.edu/report. Scroll to the bottom of the page and click “for reporting employees”, then click “report now” under “sexual misconduct”. Once you complete the form, remember to click “submit report” to finish the report. 

If you don’t have access to the internet or a computer, you can call 435-797-1266 to file a report or visit: 

  • Blanding campus Office of Equity Prevention Specialist: Bradford Lee Technology Building 121 
  • Eastern campus Office of Equity Prevention Specialist/Supportive Measures Specialist: West Instruction Building 131 
  • Logan campus Office of Equity: Old Main 161

If you need help completing the reporting form or have questions about what should be included in the report, contact the USU Title IX Coordinator at titleix@usu.edu or by calling 435-797-1266. 

You can also explore the form at any time and ask questions before you need to file a report.  

All employees have free and confidential access to the USU Sexual Assault and Anti-Violence Information Office (SAAVI) where employees can go if they need emotional support while they fill out a reporting form.  

Questions regarding your reporting obligations should be directed to the Office of Equity at 435-797-1266 or via titleix@usu.edu.

If you don’t have access to the internet or a computer, you can call 435-797-1266 to file a report or visit:  

  • Blanding campus Office of Equity Prevention Specialist: Bradford Lee Technology Building 121 
  • Eastern campus Office of Equity Prevention Specialist/Supportive Measures Specialist: West Instruction Building 131 
  • Logan campus Office of Equity: Old Main 161

The Office of Equity generally does not share information with the claimant (person who experienced the sexual misconduct or respondent (person reported for engaging in the sexual misconduct) about who filed the report unless the case proceeds to a formal investigation. However, someone may figure out that you’re the person who filed the report if you’re the only one who could reasonably know what was reported. 

Your reporting obligations still apply, even if you have concerns about retaliation. However, you can include in your report that you have concerns about retaliation. Retaliation is prohibited at USU and you can file a report with the Office of Equity if someone takes action against you because you filed a report. 

After you file a report, you will receive an automated email confirming your submission. The Office of Equity will then send an email to the claimant (the person who experienced the sexual misconduct), if known, informing them of resources and reporting options. The claimant does not have to respond to the Office of Equity’s contact. Unless there is a university-driven investigation due to a threat to university safety or a pattern of sexual misconduct, the Office of Equity does not proceed with an investigation.  

Unless we have questions about the report or you need to know information related to the case, you will not receive additional contact from the Office of Equity about your report. 

Filing a report with the Title IX Coordinator does not typically initiate an investigation. Instead, the claimant (the individual who experienced the sexual misconduct) is contacted by the Office of Equity with information about additional options for reporting, how they can access resources (including supportive measures), and how to meet with the Office of Equity. 

For more information about navigating the Office of Equity grievance process after a report is filed, visit the Office of Equity website. 

Yes. You will receive an automated email confirming you submitted a report if you include your email in the reporting form. The Office of Equity may contact you if they have additional questions related to the incident report. 

Typically, if you are not the claimant, you will not be notified about any actions the Office of Equity takes related to an incident report to protect the privacy of those involved. The Office of Equity will contact the claimant (the person who experienced the sexual misconduct) and provide them information about support services, additional reporting options, and information about filing a formal complaint.  

You can learn more about how the Office of Equity responds to reports here or by viewing our annual report. 

No. If an individual is seeking criminal action, they must report separately to either university police or local law enforcement.  

To report to the USU Title IX Coordinator, who can pursue administrative action for a USU policy violation, go here.  

To report to USU police, who can pursue legal action for a criminal violation, go here.

Exceptions to Reporting as a Reporting Employee

There are certain exceptions to your reporting obligations where you are not required to report the disclosure to USU’s Title IX Coordinator. You can review the list of exceptions in Interim USU Policy 340.  

These exceptions apply only in the context where you received the disclosure, not where the sexual misconduct occurred. For example, you are not required to report sexual misconduct (unless the respondent is a student or employee) “when the disclosure of information about sexual misconduct is made through public awareness events.” However, if you learn of sexual misconduct that occurred during the public awareness event, you are required to report it. 

USU has a responsibility to provide a safe and non-discriminatory environment for students and employees. Reporting the incident when you could reasonably know a student or employee is allegedly engaging in sexual misconduct helps the university identify safety concerns or patterns of sexual misconduct and address and remedy incidents of discrimination, harassment, and sexual misconduct that affect campus community members.

If you know or can assume that the respondent is a student or employee based on the information you have, certain exceptions do not apply and you are required to report. 

For example:  

  1. If a student discloses that a professor engaged in sexual misconduct, you would have enough information to assume the respondent is an employee because they’re a professor. 
  2. If an individual discloses their roommate engaged in sexual misconduct, and you know the individual lives in on-campus housing, you would assume the respondent (the roommate) is a student because they would also live on campus.  
  3. If an employee discloses that they’re experiencing sexual misconduct at work, you would have enough information to assume the respondent is a student or employee because the incident(s) are happening in a university workplace. 

You should not ask more questions of the disclosing party to collect more information to determine if the respondent is a student or employee. If you’re unsure if an exception applies, err on the side of caution and report in the incident.

You should always err on the side of caution and report the incident anyway. You can also contact USU’s Title IX Coordinator to ask if a disclosure falls under a reporting exception.

Yes. You can still file a report even if an exception applies. Exceptions don’t prohibit you from reporting; they are times when you are no longer required to report a disclosure.

If an exception applies, you still need to refer the individual to resources and inform them of their reporting options. They may still want you to report the incident to USU’s Title IX Coordinator, so you should ask them if they’d still like you to report the incident. 

Do I Still Have to File a Report as a Reporting Employee When/If ...?

Yes. You are required to report any information you know about sexual misconduct to USU’s Title IX Coordinator. If you learn more information after already filing a report, you are required to file an additional report with the new information you learned. 

When filing an additional report, make a comment that the report is related to an incident you previously reported. 

Yes. Reporting Employees are required to report information about sexual misconduct to the USU Title IX Coordinator, even if they learn about it from someone who is not a Reporting Employee or another third party. You should always stop someone, if possible, if it sounds like they are going to share information related to sexual misconduct and remind them of your reporting obligations and ask them if they still want to share that information.  

If they do share the information, the non-Reporting Employee should tell the individual who disclosed to them that their disclosure will be reported to the USU Title IX Coordinator by you (as the Reporting Employee). 

Yes. Unless an exception applies, you are required to report anything you learn about sexual misconduct (that involves USU students, employees, or program participants as either the person who experienced the sexual misconduct or the person who reportedly engaged in the sexual misconduct) to USU’s Title IX Coordinator. You can view the list of exceptions in Interim USU Policy 340.

Yes. You are required to report anything you know about sexual misconduct to the USU Title IX Coordinator unless an exception applies.  You can view the list of exceptions in Interim USU Policy 340. 

Even if someone else has already reported the incident, you must report it. Reporting Employees can file one report together if they include every Reporting Employee’s name on the incident report and every Reporting Employee includes all the information they know.

Yes. Even if someone tells you they want to report the incident themselves, you are also required to report the incident.

Yes. You are still required to file a report with the USU Title IX Coordinator, even if someone asks you not to. In those moments, you should validate what the individual is feeling. Remind the individual that the Office of Equity will reach out to provide support resources and reporting options, but they are not required to respond to that communication. Tell the individual that the university wants them to know about available resources that may be helpful to them.

Yes. You are required to file a report even if you think something is just a rumor or hearsay. You are not an investigator, so you should not ask for more information to try to verify the disclosure. You should also not doubt someone’s disclosure. The Office of Equity is the neutral, fact-finding party responsible for investigating and verifying information about sexual misconduct incidents.

Yes. You are required to report any information you know about an incident of sexual misconduct to USU’s Title IX Coordinator. Even reports without a lot of details allow the Office of Equity to identify patterns to better respond to and prevent sexual misconduct at our university.

No. You are not required to report an incident of sexual misconduct if you’re the one who experienced it. If you choose to report the incident to USU’s Title IX Coordinator, you can share as little or as much information as you’d like and can even report anonymously. Please know that the less information the Office of Equity knows about an incident, the less able they are to respond. 

You can also access university or community resources to support you.

Non-Designated Employee FAQs

The purpose of this FAQ guide is to assist employees who have no reporting obligations under interim USU Policy and Procedures 340: Required Reporting of Sexual Misconduct (non-designated employees) in responding to sexual misconduct disclosures. If you have obligations under interim USU Policy Procedures 340 (i.e., you are a Reporting Employee or Designated Confidential Resource), these FAQs do not apply to you, but can help you better understand how non-designated employees are encouraged to respond to sexual misconduct disclosures.

Interim - Non-Designated Employee Overview Handout

Identifying Non-Designated Employees

Employees with obligations are identified in Interim USU Policy 340. Your designation is based on your current position and/or department within the university. If you are not listed as either a Reporting Employee or a Designated Confidential Resource, you are a non-designated employee who has no obligations under USU’s sexual misconduct policies.  

You will be notified by the Office of Equity if your designation changes. You can email prevention@usu.edu if you are unsure if you are a designated employee. 

Many non-designated employees are required to take an annual training that covers best practices for responding to a disclosure of sexual misconduct.   

Non-designated employees with an annual training requirement are:  

  • Full-time, benefited employees  
  • Wage hourly employees who are:  
    • Office or staff assistants, receptionists  
    • Peer mentors/advisors  
    • Undergraduate teaching fellows  
    • Undergraduate teaching and research assistants  
    • Classroom and broadcast facilitators  
    • Tutors   
  • Wage hourly employees who work in:  
    • Athletics  
    • Student Affairs  
    • Sorenson Legacy Foundation Center for Clinical Excellence  
    • Disability Resource Center  
    • Financial Aid  
    • Human Resources 

Review the employee training FAQs for more information about the training. 

Any non-designated employee that is not required to attend an annual training can still opt in to a training by emailing prevention@usu.edu.

The university wants individuals to know where they can go to report sexual misconduct and receive support, but also wants to give the individual autonomy over where their information is shared.  

Many university employees that were previously designated as “responsible employees” (and therefore required to report) no longer have a designation, meaning they are not required to report information about sexual misconduct to the USU Title IX Coordinator. This shift is due to the Title IX regulations that were implemented by the US Department of Education in August 2020 that no longer required all employees at a university to report information about sexual misconduct to the university.  

Responding to a Sexual Misconduct Disclosure as a Non-Designated Employee

You should provide an individual who discloses sexual misconduct with information about support services and various reporting options 

You are not required to report disclosures of sexual misconduct to the USU Title IX Coordinator. You should tell them that disclosing to you won’t initiate university action. Ask them if they would like you to report the information to the USU Title IX Coordinator for a university response.  

You should follow the best practices outlined in this handout when responding to a disclosure.

You should follow the four steps outlined in the Non-Designated Employee training handout that is linked above when you respond to a disclosure. Be sure to remain empathetic and validate the disclosing party throughout. Do not question their experience or blame them for what happened. You can learn more about responding in a trauma-informed way here. 

You should provide an individual who discloses information concerning sexual misconduct with information about support services and various reporting options, including information about how to report their experience to the USU Title IX Coordinator. 

USU’s Sexual Respect website includes a variety of university and community resources to direct someone toward.

You cannot request supportive measures for another individual. You can direct them to the website where they can schedule an intake meeting to request supportive measures and support them while they schedule an intake. You can also direct the individual to visit an Office of Equity location in person (Old Main room 161 in Logan) or call the Office of Equity at 435-797-1266 to schedule a meeting to access supportive measures.

If someone is in a dangerous situation, call 9-1-1 immediately. If you are concerned about someone’s well-being, you can seek additional support as appropriate.  

  • If it’s an emergency and someone needs immediate support, call 9-1-1. 
  • If you’re concerned for a student’s well-being, contact the CARE team by filing a student of concern report. Please remind the student about CAPS and ask if you want to connect them to their office. 
  • If you’re concerned for an employee’s well-being, contact Becca Seamons in Human Resources at becca.seamons@usu.edu.  
  • USU’s Sexual Respect website also contains contact information for local advocacy organizations (including USU’s SAAVI office) and various national and state crisis hotlines who can help someone safety plan.

If you are concerned about someone’s well-being after they disclose to you, you can check in on them or contact Becca Seamons in Human Resources (for employees) at becca.seamons@usu.edu or the CARE team (for students) so they can check in on them. 

When you check in on someone, be respectful and mindful of their boundaries. They may not be in a place where they want to talk about the incident. When an individual first discloses to you, you can ask the individual if they would like you to check on them and how and when they would like you to check on them. 

All employees have free and confidential access to the Sexual Assault and Anti-Violence Information Office (SAAVI) as a space to process your own experiences or someone else’s. You can also access the community resources listed on this website.

You should respect someone’s choices, even if that choice is not to access resources or report the incident. Everyone knows their own situation best, and it’s valid if resources or reporting aren’t best for them in the moment. Let them know you’re concerned about them, but you respect that they know best. Show them where they can access resources and share how they can contact you in the future if they change their mind.

You can help someone who experiences sexual misconduct, even if they don’t disclose to you directly. Upstanding strategies (direct, delegate, distract, delay, and document) can be effective tools to intervene before, during, or after harm occurs. 

One strategy may be contacting someone who does know the individual to ensure they have received information about support resources and reporting options.

Non-Designated Employee Reporting Obligations

No. While you can tell someone that you will generally keep what they tell you private, Designated Confidential Resources are the only employees who can keep sexual misconduct disclosures confidential under USU’s sexual misconduct policies.

Non-designated employees do not have reporting obligations under Interim USU Policy and Procedures 340: Required Reporting of Sexual Misconduct. However, Non-designated employees may have additional reporting obligations under university policy and state, and federal law.

If you have responsibilities to report sexual misconduct to another entity, you should inform someone before they disclose (if possible) about your additional responsibilities.

Yes. Reporting Employees are required to report information about sexual misconduct to the USU Title IX Coordinator, even if they learn about it from someone who is not a Reporting Employee or another third party. You should ask the individual before sharing information they disclosed about sexual misconduct to someone else. 

If an individual discloses information about sexual misconduct to you and you then tell a Reporting Employee that information, you should notify the individual who made the disclosure that their disclosure will be reported to the USU Title IX Coordinator by the Reporting Employee. 

Filing a Report as a Non-Designated Employee

Yes. You can help someone fill out a report to the USU Title IX Coordinator or fill out the report yourself if they ask you to.

If you don’t have access to the internet or a computer, you can call 435-797-1266 to file a report or visit: 

  • Blanding campus Office of Equity Prevention Specialist: Bradford Lee Technology Building 121 
  • Eastern campus Office of Equity Prevention Specialist/Supportive Measures Specialist: West Instruction Building 131 
  • Logan campus Office of Equity: Old Main 161

Yes.  You are allowed to file anonymous reports about sexual misconduct incidents. However, anonymous reports do not always contain enough information to pursue an investigation that can lead to disciplinary action. If you choose to report anonymously, we encourage you to provide as much information as you can.

Yes. You will receive an automated email confirming you submitted a report if you include your email in the reporting form. The Office of Equity may contact you if they have additional questions related to the incident report.

Typically, you will not be notified about any actions the Office of Equity takes related to an incident report. The Office of Equity will contact the claimant (the person who experienced the sexual misconduct) and provide them information about support services, additional reporting options, and information about filing a formal complaint. 

You can learn more about how the Office of Equity responds to reports here or by viewing our annual report.